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Showing 4 posts in Dodd-Frank.

CFPB Rule Bars the Use of Mandatory Arbitration Clauses to Prohibit Class Actions; Some Members of Congress Vow to Take Action to Reverse

This week, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) adopted a final rule prohibiting a broad range of financial firms from using mandatory arbitration clauses to bar class action suits and received wide press coverage. The CFPB announced that this final rule would "restore the ability of groups of people to file or join group lawsuits." Some in the financial services industry potentially subject to the rule have already issued statements opposing and attacking it and asking that Congress use its statutory authority to reverse the CFPB's action. More ›

Treasury Echoes Trump: Deregulate to Improve Financial Systems

Shortly after taking office, President Trump issued an Executive Order to establish a policy for regulating the United States financial system under seven "Core Principles," and to order a report from the United States Treasury that assesses financial markets. Last week, Treasury responded with its first 150 page report on the current state of the financial system that outlines proposed regulatory changes. Treasury points the finger at the Obama administration’s 2010 enactment of Dodd-Frank for imposing regulatory requirements insufficiently tailored or coordinated among agencies, unrelated to addressing the problems leading to the great recession, and applied in an overly prescriptive manner. In no uncertain terms, the report concludes that the scope and excess costs imposed by Dodd-Frank have resulted in a slower rate of growth in the financial markets. Unsurprisingly, Treasury’s regulatory recommendations coincide with Congress’ current legislative effort at replacing Dodd-Frank with the Financial Choice Act. More ›

Congress Takes a Significant Step Towards Replacing Dodd-Frank and Gutting the CFPB

On Thursday, as we anticipated in a previous blog post, the House of Representatives voted along party lines to pass the Financial CHOICE ACT ("FCA"), which would repeal Dodd-Frank and strip the CFPB of its authority.

The debate leading up to the vote also appeared to divide sharply along partisan lines, with Republicans urging their colleagues to vote for the Bill, and Democrats insisting that it was the "Wrong Choice" for Americans. Despite their differing opinions, representatives from all parties appeared to articulate the same goal: putting Main Street America ahead of Wall Street.

Supporters of the FCA contend that the purported benefits of Dodd-Frank have never materialized. They argue that due to Dodd-Frank’s excessive and expensive regulatory burdens, small banks and businesses have failed, while big banks have continued to thrive. Imposing the same regulations on every financial institution, they say, has strangled small community banks, and forced many to shut down. This problem triggered another major concern of the bill's supporters, namely an alleged lack of choice of financial products and the increased cost of these same products. More ›

Congress Seeks Dodd-Frank Overhaul and Elephant Dart for Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

On May 4, 2017, the House Financial Services Committee passed HR 10, the Financial CHOICE ACT ("FCA") by a 34-26 vote, with all proposed Democratic redlines rejected. The FCA is expected to go to a full House vote as early as this week. 

The FCA purports to keep the protections Dodd-Frank aimed to enact, while at the same time freeing regulations on the American economy. It promises to "create hope and opportunity for investors, consumers, and entrepreneurs," by, among other things, ending bailouts and "holding Washington and Wall Street accountable."

FCA, as drafted, would repeal the Dodd-Frank Act in its entirety, remove CFPB supervisory authority over financial institutions, and allow the President to appoint, and remove at will, a CFPB director.  Moreover, FCA would remove any authority the CFPB has to investigate actions it deems abusive, but would keep the agency in place, changing its name from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to the Consumer Law Enforcement Agency (CLEA). More ›

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