Menu

Showing 2 posts in Loan Modification.

Cover Letter from Loan Servicer May Unwittingly Change Terms of Forbearance Agreement

In Traut v. Quantum Servicing Corp., on the grounds that a cover letter accompanying a forbearance agreement may have altered the terms of that agreement, the Massachusetts federal court denied a loan servicer's motion for summary judgment in a lawsuit where the borrowers claimed breach of contract arising out of a loan modification agreement. The forbearance agreement required an additional down payment and six monthly installment payments. The cover letter to that agreement stated that the loan "will be modified," modification documents "will be generated" and some of the arrearage would be forgiven if six monthly payments were made. The servicer did not permanently modify the loan because two of the six payments on the forbearance agreement were late resulting in a breach. More ›

Franz Kafka, Sisyphus, and Foreclosures: Bank of America Fined $45 Million by Bankruptcy Court For Violation of Automatic Stay

"Franz Kafka lives. This automatic stay violation case reveals that he works at Bank of America." Thus begins an opinion stretching over 100 pages in length in which United States Bankruptcy Judge Christopher Klein fined Bank of America over $45 million for what he found to be an egregious violation of the automatic bankruptcy stay.

According to the order, the Sundquists, at the behest of advice given them by Bank of America, defaulted on their real property loan in 2009 so that they could be considered for a loan modification. The court found that this was followed by a "'multi-year 'dual tracking" game of cat-and-mouse" by Bank of America, which included repeated requests for information which had grown stale and incomprehensible denials of applications. Most central to the court's holding was that, although the Sundquists filed a Chapter 13 bankruptcy petition in June 2010, Bank of America proceeded with a foreclosure sale even though it had notice of the Sundquists' bankruptcy case. Clearly meaning to send a signal which would be heard in the bank's highest offices (in addition to Kafka, the opinion also references the myth of Sisyphus and the Watergate scandal), the court was clearly moved by the emotional distress documented by the plaintiffs (which included discussions of suicide attempts). More ›

Search
Subscribe via Email