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Showing 4 posts from March 2018.

Cover Letter from Loan Servicer May Unwittingly Change Terms of Forbearance Agreement

In Traut v. Quantum Servicing Corp., on the grounds that a cover letter accompanying a forbearance agreement may have altered the terms of that agreement, the Massachusetts federal court denied a loan servicer's motion for summary judgment in a lawsuit where the borrowers claimed breach of contract arising out of a loan modification agreement. The forbearance agreement required an additional down payment and six monthly installment payments. The cover letter to that agreement stated that the loan "will be modified," modification documents "will be generated" and some of the arrearage would be forgiven if six monthly payments were made. The servicer did not permanently modify the loan because two of the six payments on the forbearance agreement were late resulting in a breach. More ›

California Appellate Court Permits Debt Collection Suit against Mortgage Loan Servicer

Acknowledging a split of authority among the many federal courts reviewing whether a mortgage loan servicer falls within the FDCPA's definition of a "debt collector," one California appellate court has revived a putative class action dismissed at the trial court through which borrowers pursued fair debt claims under the Rosenthal Act. The decision issued in Davidson v. Seterus is significant because borrowers could not pursue these claims under the more restrictive FDCPA. More ›

HUD Regulation Requiring Face-to-Face Meeting Presents Compliance Challenge for Lenders Seeking Mortgage Foreclosure

In Dan-Harry v. PNC Bank, the Rhode Island federal court concluded that a mortgagor may bring a claim for damages and other remedies against a mortgagee on allegations of failure to conduct a pre-foreclosure face-to-face meeting required for breach of an FHA-insured mortgage. Dawari Dan-Harry obtained an FHA-insured mortgage loan to purchase property in Providence, Rhode Island, which included in Paragraph 9(d) the following provisions: "Regulations of HUD Secretary. In many circumstances regulations issued by the Secretary will limit Lender's rights, in the case of payment defaults, to require immediate payment in full, and foreclose if not paid. This Security Instrument does not authorize acceleration or foreclosure if not permitted by regulations of the Secretary." PNC Bank foreclosed on the mortgage and sold the property at auction to a third-party in January 2017. While continuing to occupy the property, Dan-Harry sued PNC for damages and to void the foreclosure sale on allegations that PNC failed to comply with HUD regulation 24 C.F.R. § 203.604(b), which requires a mortgagee to have a face-to-face meeting with the mortgagor or make a reasonable effort to arrange such a meeting before the mortgage becomes three months delinquent in payments. More ›

Distilling the DC Circuit's TCPA Decision in ACA International v. FCC

In a case we have been tracking closely, a unanimous panel of the D.C. Court of Appeals set aside two key determinations of the FCC's interpretations of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act. In ACA International, et al. v. FCC, Judge Sri Srinivasan found that the FCC's "explanation of what qualifies" as an automated telephone dialer service (ATDS) and its one-call safe harbor for calling a phone number that has been reassigned to a non-consenting person was arbitrary and capricious. However, the Court sustained the FCC's rulings on revocation of consent "through any reasonable means clearly expressing a desire to receive no further messages" and the scope of the exemption for "time-sensitive healthcare calls." More ›

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