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Showing 3 posts in Second Circuit.

Northern District of New York Dismisses another Avila Claim Based on Accrual of New York Pre-Judgment Interest

One of the latest trends in the New York FDCPA space has been filing so called "Reverse Avila" cases, based on the Second Circuit's decision in Avila v. Riexinger and Assocs.. In Avila, the Second Circuit found that a debt collection letter violated the FDCPA because the letter failed to state that interest on the debt was accruing. Since Avila, new theories related to the accrual of interest claims have surfaced, including: (1) the "Reverse Avila" claim, and (2) claims requiring Avila safe harbor language in correspondence if there is any possibility (however small) that interest will accrue in the future--even if the debt was not actually increasing at the time of the correspondence. Courts have begun to deny these claims because they stretch the meaning of Avila into the realm of pure speculation. More ›

Happiness is not a Fresh Baguette: Failure to Redact Expiration Date Insufficient to Create Standing under FACTA

Happiness is not a fresh baguette…at least not for one FACTA plaintiff. In Crupar-Weinmann v. Paris Baguette America, Inc., the Second Circuit, in line with the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision in Spokeo, Inc. v. Robins, 136 S. Ct. 1540 (2016), affirmed the District Court’s dismissal of plaintiff’s complaint with prejudice. The Second Circuit held that while Paris Baguette’s failure to redact the expiration date of plaintiff’s credit card number was a technical violation of the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003 (“FACTA”), by itself, that violation did not result in an injury sufficient to confer Article III standing. More ›

Second Circuit Says No to Unilateral Revocation of TCPA Consent to Contact, Citing Contract Principles

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals has split with the Third Circuit, the Eleventh Circuit, and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), and utilized contract principles to hold that a consumer may not necessarily have the ability to unilaterally revoke consent to contact under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (TCPA). The decision shifts the focus of a TCPA claim from simply deciding whether the consumer revoked consent to whether consent to contact could be revoked by contract standards. More ›

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